Thursday, November 16, 2017

FM 136 DEDICATED LADY ORCHID PART OF THE BLUE NOSE SQDRN RCAF

FM 136 DEDICATED LADY ORCHID PART OF THE BLUE NOSE SQDRN RCAF
""FM136 C/N #3337 code RX136 dedicated =
as the Lady Orchid of 434 Blue Nose Sqdrn RCAF""

Built in May 1945; Delivered to England in Jun 1945 to (a)#32(MU) Lyneham Wilts; issued to (b)#419(HB) squadron Returned to Canada for use with Tiger Force on the August 29th 1945 but too late for that force; stored at Pearce,Alta.; Converted Mk.10MR; issued to (c)#404(MP) Sqdrn. Greenwood, N.S.; later transferred to (d)#407(MR) Sqdrn. Comox, B.C. then as code 'RX136' (1952-59); stored at Ft. Macleod, Alta.; coded 'RX136' (1952-59); stored at Ft. Macleod, Alta.; flown to Calgary C.C.A.Reg as CF-NJQ; in 1961 then placed on a pedestal in front of the Main Terminal at the Calgary International Airport on 1962. 

Then re-coded (e)'VN-N' of #50(B) Sqdrn RAF on the pedistal; put under the care of the Aero Space Museum of Calgary and repainted in 1986 to wartime camouflage with code (f)'NA-P' of #428(B) Sqdrn RCAF; removed and from the pedestal in Apr.1992 and rededicated (g)'WLO #434 Sqdrn RCAF and now permanently displayed at the HANGAR FLIGHT MUSEUM which is owned by the People of Calgary, City of Calgary Alberta Canada.
Lancaster Mk X serial KB895 aircraft was air-tested by Ron Jenkins Pilot/Sipper and crew;
Navigator - F/O Savage A.W.
Bomb Aimer - F/O Hines P. J.
Wire Operator - F/Sgt. Mc Lean N
Engineer - Sgt. Foss D. C. 
Rear Gunner - Sgt. Baird T. B.
Mid-Upper - F/Sgt. Moodie K.

Upon completion of the testing Wing Commander J.C. Mulvihill informed Jenkins the new bomber, serial KB895, would become his bomber with code WL-O. The crew now decided “their” bomber needed a name and Nose Art painting. At first they named her “Wee Lady Orchid” for each of the code letters, then later dropped the Wee and she became “Lady Orchid”.

Pilot Jenkins painted the name in large white letters with a larger red capital L and O. The complete crew then shared in the painting of the Lady Godiva pin-up riding a bomb while holding two Calgary Western style six shooters with Ochid nose art painted fully nude.
 

Squadrons our (FM136) actually belonged too:
a) 6 Group
b) 419 Moose Attack
Sqdrn RCAF
c) 404 Buffalo
Sqdrn RCAF
d) 407 Demon Sqdrn RCAF
e) #50 Home to Attack Sqdrn RAF
f) 428 Ghost Sqdrn RCAF
g) 434 Blue Nose
Sqdrn RCAF
This is why the KB895 WLO Lady Orchid (FM136) has Blue Spinners over the 4 props, as she is part of "Blue Nose Squardron".
 

Posted by,
Richard Abbenbroek

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

YELLOW PAINT DOTS AND TRIANGLES ON LANCASTER BOMBERS AND OTHER AIRCRAFT

 
YELLOW PAINT DOTS AND TRIANGLES ON LANCASTER BOMBERS AND OTHER AIRCRAFT
One thought for the yellow dot on the pilot’s seat is it is a warning that the plate is made of armor steel, and therefore is much heavier than it might appear, so don't try to lift it/remove it without appropriate lifting equipment.

The other thought is that it is Gas warning paint was external: initially yellow and applied as a diamond shape visible to the pilot, but apparently later produced in the camouflage colors.
Sadly, as time moves on this bit of odd history is becoming. A point that nobody knows for certain what the painted yellow circle is for?


I've seen any photos of the "anti-gas" circle painted on the nose area of a Lancaster Bomber, supposedly just aft of the front turret, the accompanying text saying something along the lines of the use of such markings being withdrawn.

Gas indication panels on aircraft were NEVER intended to be viewed (for gas indication purposes) by personnel whilst the aircraft was in the air! I have read the official WW2 RAF Gas Manual and it is quite clear that the "powers that be" did due to WW1 expected gas attacks on RAF aerodromes as a matter of course (although apparently the Luftwaffe probably did not know about this!) and that dispersed aircraft were as good an article to apply the special paint to as anything else for the protection of personnel at these dispersed sites. Let's face it, do you recall ever hearing that anybody ever envisaged trying to bring down enemy aircraft in flight by extension of gas warfare up to 15 - 20,00 feet altitude??

Possibly not, for the reasons described. However, they would be needed to be visible by the crew for the case of arriving at an airfield which had been gas attacked, or for the knowledge that they had flown though a gas cloud and thus contaminated the aircraft with nerve agents as Germany had tons of Sarin gas but for some unknown reason never used it? Remember that in 1940 the RAF were planning to use gas on any invasion beach.

On a Spitfire and other fighters, they these gas, gas, gas markings were on the inner wing, near the trailing edge. It was approximately 18 inches square, normally painted, but could be thick paper, taped into position with the predecessor of 'Gaffer' or 'Duct' tape, normally colored black. The position on the Spitfire was 6 feet six inches from the center line of the fuselage, at the rear of the center line of the wing chord. On the Hurricane, the position was similar, but 9 feet 6 inches from the fuselage center line.

Little information exists as to how often it was changed or replaced, if at all, and it wasn't always present on all aircraft of the period, and removed, or painted over, if the aircraft was returned to a MU for deep service and re-paint.

The color was pale yellow, with a very slight green tinge, which changed color in the presence of various poisonous gasses, the color change hue depending on the type of gas.
By late summer 1940, with the threat of gas attack apparently diminished, these patches were seen less and less, eventually falling out of use, although, as stated in my reply, gas warning panels remained in use on military bases, and around Government and 'official' buildings in the UK throughout WW2, with the carrying of gas masks was obligatory.


Then again if It was not for the detection of poison gas the yellow indicates armor plating? As there is a lot of armor plate in the Lancaster. With every recovery many thick armor plates are found.
I also one read that a former crew member said that by marking the armor plating with a yellow disk, this would also make it easier to allow for any compass deviation corrections to be made.

So, the yellow dot on the Lancaster pilot's sliding head armour being an example. I've read all sorts of explanations (which side was hardened, something to do with magnetic fields/compasses to name a couple) but never that it was for gas detection. The Mosquito armor was similarly marked, and both continued to be so long after gas detection patches/paint were abandoned.

In November 1940 there was a short-lived modification to the Spitfire (cancelled after nine days), "to paint yellow markings on magnetic armor plates." It was abandoned because the armor was found not to affect the compass. This lends some credence to the magnetic field/compass theory.

The external patches were to indicate the need to decontaminate the aircraft (if exposed), which apparently involved washing with water. This was to protect the ground personnel from contamination. Having the paint inside the aircraft seems illogical.

Lancaster squadrons which eventually formed part of 100 Group carried a disc of gas detection paint on the outside nose, beneath the turret. This apparently was paint as I've read in the past by former ground and air crew from one of the squadrons, and of course served the same purpose as those patches on other aircraft types.

The same flight crew member in my readings said; that the disc on the head armor was for the detection of carbon monoxide inside the cabin, which could possibly leak from the heating system, driven off the engine exhaust, which fed into the cabin at the wireless op's position. This may or may not be the case, but I'll admit that the carbon monoxide detection 'badge' in light aircraft I've read that flew was more of a pink, rather than yellow color.
Though strange how the Avro Manchester didn't have the painted yellow spot but was the exact same seat & armor used in the Lancaster.

F.Y.I. Head armor material specification: 9mm armor plate (non-magnetic) indicate that it does not interfere with compass.
LANCASTER
https://youtu.be/sSXiny5mEpg
Of the 125,000 men volunteered to fight for RAF Bomber Command during World War II. 55,573 never returned, 10,000 were Canadian.
By,
Richard Abbenbroek
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

THE LANCASTER TRAILING ANTENNA

 THE LANCASTER TRAILING ANTENNA
The Lancaster trailing antenna mount, just below the leading edge of the attach point of the Bomb Bay doors does on the port side (left side), of the Lancaster.
The 'bobbles' or lead weights on the end of the antenna wire.


To restore this trailing antenna 'bobbles' just use lead weights.
One would need a few lead weights and also probably fishing line weights would do.

A piece of copper wire to make the trailing antenna with 'bobbles' or just Insert a bit to give the appearance of a trailing antenna. Which was reeled out and in, as needed during the flight.

Trailing aerial winch in photos below is the winch for a trailing aerial as fitted to Lancaster and other heavy bomber's. It is In excellent condition and it still function's perfectly.
For reception of communications signals, the receiver could be operated with either fixed or trailing aerials; a fixed aerial was normally used for the HF (High frequency) radio frequencies between 3 and 30 MHz., and the trailing aerial for airborne installations on the MF ranges or Medium Frequencies which are designated for distress and safety purposes.

If this failed Lancaster's carried 2 homing pigeons. The trailing antenna mount, again is located just below the leading edge on the port side of the Lancaster. The main part or winch device is located by the Wireless Operator with its motor breaker, located on the starboard interior wall across from the
Wireless Operator.
END
by Richard Abbenbroek
 
  

AVRO LANCASTER - SPECIFICATIONS


AVRO LANCASTER
- SPECIFICATIONS

ENGINES:

Mk.I
Four Rolls-Royce Merlin XX or 22, 12 cylinder 60 degrees vee-type liquid cooled engines
with two stage superchargers.

Mk.II
Four Bristol Hercules VI or XVI, 14-cylinder sleeve-valve, air cooled radial engines
with two stage centrifugal supercharger.

Mk.III
Four Rolls-Royce Merlin 224, 12 cylinder 60 degrees vee-type liquid cooled engines
with two stage superchargers.

Mk.X
Four Rolls-Royce Merlin 224, 12 cylinder 60 degrees vee-type liquid cooled engines
with two stage superchargers.

A Merlin Engine with Jay Leno = https://youtu.be/GYcKdK7hmEo

DIMENSIONS:
Wingspan: 102 feet
Length: 69 feet 6 inches
Height: 20 feet 6 inches
Undercarriage Track: 23 feet 9 inches
Wing Area: 1300 square feet
Tailplane Area: 237 square feet

SPEED:
Max at Sea Level: 245 mph
Max at 15,000 feet: 275 mph
Cruise at 15,000 feet: 200 mph

WEIGHTS:
Empty Weight: 36,900 lbs.
Maximum Weight: 70,000 lbs.

OPERATIONAL SPECIFICATIONS:
Ceiling: 20,000 feet
Rate of climb: 250 ft/min
Take-off to 50 feet: 4650 feet
Landing from 50 feet: 3000 feet

RANGE:
2530 miles - with 7000 pound bomb load
1730 miles - with 12,000 pound bomb load
1550 miles - with 22,000 pound bomb load

ARMAMENT:
F.N. 5 front turret: Two 0.303 machine guns
F.N. 20 rear turret: Four 0.303 machine guns
F.N. 50 mid-upper turret: Two 0.303 machine guns
LANCASTER
Posted by Sir Richard
 
 

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

NOTE:

NOTE: 
IF I POST WITH PHOTOS AND ATTACHED MUSIC. 
IT MEANS THAT I AM JUST VENTING TO MY 
BLOG, OR FACEBOOK, TWITTER, LINKEDIN 
AND MYSPACE.
BUT if you see only text and No photos and No songs this means,
that I may be distressed and maybe You Should Call ME to hear how's things!
For some of you, this may be the first step to your repentance,
and acceptance of JESUS CHRIST through an act of forgiveness or not.

Matthew 6:14-15
For if you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly 
Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive men their sins, 
your Father will not forgive your sins.
So I forgive all of you who have hurt me, intentionally or not.

Forgiveness doesn’t = reconciliation.  
https://youtu.be/4lOrQspaklM
Forgiveness and reconciliation are two separate things. We can (and should) forgive those who sin against us. Forgiveness is something that takes place between the one who has been hurt and GOD.  Did you catch that? Because I had to pause for a minute and wrap my brain around it. When someone hurts me, I go to GOD and work out the forgiveness part. Not the other person. I forgive, not to set the other person free – only GOD can save people. I forgive because GOD wants to set ME free!

As for the one whom you forgave, they never had to be sorry. They never had to change. As long as I was doing my Christian duty, they could almost do whatever they wanted to. For if you think that this was supposed to eventually cause a metamorphosis in the other person and give GOD glory you are only fooling yourself, as what you really need is Reconciliation.

Reconciliation is when you take a damaged relationship and heal it. When people go through the reconciliation process right, the relationship has the potential to be even stronger than it was before. Conversely, when the reconciliation process is circumvented by well-meaning but “patch-it-up-quick” folks, the hurt party can become resentful over time, and the relationship isn’t healed; it’s more deeply damaged.

How many times do we take things into our own hands and try to play the part of the Holy Spirit? Both of my hands are raised. Big mistake. Because putting pressure on someone to be convicted is a wasted effort. It’s not even real conviction. The person may go through hoops to get you to calm down or go back to status quo, but they will never, ever, ever, ever change because you pressured them to change. Ever. So why try? 

Conviction is a work of the Holy Spirit, so let Him do it and if the other person is never convicted of their sin, that’s an important piece of information about their spiritual health which will help you make future decisions about your relationship with them. Don’t ignore it or make light of it. To never be convicted is serious business. Self-reflect here; “When was the last time I was convicted and said I was sorry for something specific I did to hurt someone else?” Hint: It should be less than 24 hours unless your name is JESUS CHRIST.

When a person is convicted by GOD about his/her sin, they are convicted about specifics, not generalities. Has anyone ever said to you, “I’m sorry I hurt you all these years.” Then expect you to forgive and forget? All is well – let’s move on? As I tell my kids, “Sorry, but sorry doesn’t cut it.” A person who is convicted by the Holy Spirit will be remorseful over the specific things they have done without anyone else telling them what those things are!
So it’s never going to go like this: “Hey, just tell me what I did wrong! I’m sorry! I SAID I WAS SORRY! How am I supposed to know what I did wrong if you don’t tell me?” 
That is not HOLY SPIRIT inspired. That isn’t a person who has any self-awareness or insight into his/her effect on others.
When we hurt someone, we need to humble ourselves and own our sin. GOD says “a broken and contrite heart I will not despise.” Contrition is brokenness over sin. It recognizes that I have failed. I have no rights. I’m wrong. I will take responsibility and change my behavior.

I’ve idolized people, and I’ve wanted their Love and approval more than I wanted GOD and His approval. I had to have the acceptance and even admiration of others.  In my closest relationships since childhood, I have not been willing to let go. I have not wanted to detach. There was something broken in me that had to hang on to those relationships even though I was being used, and they were destructive and I loved GOD desperately! But you see, He sees our hearts, and He knew I didn’t Love Him as desperately as I Loved approval and acceptance. He wants all of us. Every corner of our being. The wide open spaces and the dark hidden places.

I’m not sure I could make all of this click on my own. I tried, and I couldn’t “get it.” But finally GOD flipped on the light switch, and everything fell into place. It made sense, and now I was ready. 
I let go really and truly and I was FREE! But it did have to be a GOD-Given Empowerment. GOD-given courage. It’s been for some weeks, others several months and some years now since I let go. 
In this time those months have progressively moved me in a new, healthier direction in all of my relationships. It has also helped me see more clearly what to keep and what to let go.
https://youtu.be/FxoMbPWuk0I
NOTE: I forgive you, by Sir Richard.

Monday, October 23, 2017

DEALING WITH TRUMP AND PENCE

DEALING WITH TRUMP AND PENCE
It is on my Christmas/Bucket List & I also pray for it every time I can. 
Though through prayer I lift up Donald Trump to the LORD. 
I also lift up Mike Pence to the LORD to deal with as I am tired of 
being mean to both. For both are mentally draining and dangerous! 
I take their life draining burden off my weak
shoulders and pray that the LORD do with both as He Will! 
Amen.

Friday, October 13, 2017

SILENT ONES by RAZ TILLEY

SILENT ONES by RAZ TILLEY
Just released my latest single, SILENT ONES. It’s a song that is a bit different and unusual. It was inspired by a close school friend and is dedicated to the deep and observant, but often silent thinkers among us. Don’t forget to listen to the Silent Ones. And please share this video wherever you can.
With this message you’ll find a free download link for Silent Ones, which I’ve bundled-up with all my other recent recordings (Originals + Covers, 7-songs in total) into an Album called Singles.
Thank you kindly for your continued support.
Love
RAZ
Shiraz (Raz) Tilley

SILENT ONES
https://youtu.be/_h50BaZIUgs

To download the album "SINGLES" for free, go to http://shiraztilley.com/dl and enter the code 
wpei-zigi
Posted by Sir Richard To The Bayo-Hunter

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

NUKE WAR WITH NORTH KOREA

NUKE WAR WITH NORTH KOREA
IMO Sounds like the press wants a nuclear war. No one will benefit from a nuclear war. The press needs to stop reporting on everything Trump says and Trump needs to stop tweeting like a high school kid on everything. Such nonprofessional demonstrations by all parties.

The premise of these news reports or articles are nonsense as they all assumes that Kim Jong un wants to commit suicide! Why would he?
Since his Granddad was threatened by Ike, as one of the reasons to end the Korean War with Nuclear War, is where their passion to have Nukes came from.
With 30-60 nuclear weapons almost guarantee's his survival, through nuclear deterrence. The real wild card is not Kim's sanity. It's Trump's! Is Trump willing to waste hundreds of thousands of US, Korean, and Japanese lives attacking North Korea? We lost as allies 60,000 soldiers and airmen in 7 years in Vietnam along with 2,000,000 Vietnamese and for what? They are our allies now and they are still communist in some form.

In all how popular was that war? We could lose that many in a moment in a new Korean War. Normally, that would be unacceptable, we would learn to live with one more nuclear armed nation, as we have with the USSR and other adversaries. But we don't know if Trump has thought about this or through, or even cares about casualties. He has no experience in public service of any kind and no military service of any kind either.
He speaks and communicates impulsively, with little wisdom in evidence, and he doesn't appreciate what WAR really is!
The root of the problem is a stupid segment of American Republican voters elected an unfit, even unhinged man to President and the Republican members of Congress will not get the courage to step up and get rid of him immediately, impeaching him through some sort of Constitutional Amendment.

Making vague threats that there will be "a storm" or the "calm before the storm" that a President of the most powerful country on earth cannot be self disciplined?
IMO qualifies him along with his past for Impeachment on some sort of grounds. So, grow some balls and or backbone and step up and do it, those in position of power! If you love your country and the world above your ass kissing of the current tenant of the White House!!

NUCLEAR ARSENALS
Nine countries together possess around 15,000 nuclear weapons. The United States and Russia maintain roughly 1,800 of their nuclear weapons on high-alert status (always), ready to be launched within minutes of a warning. Most are many times more powerful than the atomic bombs dropped on Japan in 1945. A single nuclear warhead, if detonated on a large city, could kill millions of people, with the effects persisting for decades.

The failure of the nuclear powers to disarm has heightened the risk that other countries will acquire nuclear weapons. The only guarantee against the spread and use of nuclear weapons is to eliminate them without delay. Although the leaders of some nuclear-armed nations have expressed their vision for a nuclear-weapon-free world, they have failed to develop any detailed plans to eliminate their arsenals and are modernizing them.
How many nuclear weapons are there in the world?

COUNTRY NUCLEAR - PROGRAM - SIZE OF ARSENAL:

United States
The first country to develop nuclear weapons and the only country to have used them in war. It spends more on its nuclear arsenal than all other countries combined.
6,800 warheads

Russia
The second country to develop nuclear weapons. It has the largest arsenal of any country and is investing heavily in the modernization of its warheads and delivery systems.
7,000 warheads

United Kingdom
It maintains a fleet of four nuclear-armed submarines in Scotland, each carrying 16 Trident missiles. Its parliament voted in 2016 to overhaul its nuclear forces.
215 warheads

France
Most of its nuclear warheads are deployed on submarines equipped with M45 and M51 missiles. One boat is on patrol at all times. Some warheads are also deliverable by aircraft.
300 warheads

China
It has a much smaller arsenal than the US and Russia. Its warheads are deliverable by air, land and sea. It appears to be increasing the size of its arsenal at a slow pace.
270 warheads

India
It developed nuclear weapons in breach of non-proliferation commitments. It is increasing the size of its nuclear arsenal and enhancing its delivery capabilities.
110–120 warheads

Pakistan
It is making substantial improvements to its nuclear arsenal and associated infrastructure. It has increased the size of its nuclear arsenal in recent years.
120-130 warheads

Israel
It has a policy of ambiguity in relation to its nuclear arsenal, neither confirming nor denying its existence. As a result, there is little public information or debate about it.
80 warheads

North Korea
It has a fledgling nuclear weapons program. Its arsenal probably comprises fewer than 10 but could be between 30 -60 warheads. It is not clear whether it has the capability to deliver them but let’s for the sake of argument keep it at;
> 10 warheads.
WORLD TOTAL = 14,900 warheads https://youtu.be/mEtldt-FI8Y

From my Photos of my past, has the world changed much =
NO NOT REALLY, NOT REALLY AT ALL! - posted by Richard.
DO WATCH THIS FROM ENACTMENT OF 1962:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Monday, October 9, 2017

OUR LADY ORCHID



OUR LADY ORCHID
Victory Aircraft Ltd manufactured Mk X Lancaster Bomber FM136, Serial number 31341, in 1945. Assigned to No. 20th and 30th Maintenance Units in England, it was never issued to an active squadron. Returned to Canada to the depot at Pearce, Alberta, it was eventually converted to Maritime Reconnaissance configuration and taken on strength by No. 404 ‘Buffalo’ (Maritime Patrol) Squadron in Greenwood, Nova Scotia.
FM136 was subsequently transferred to No.407 'Demon' (MP) Squadron in Comox, British Columbia carrying operational markings RX-136 until it was struck off strength in April 1961. The aircraft was returned to Fort McLeod, Alberta to be War Surplus.

FM136 was acquired by the Lancaster Club of Calgary and mounted on a pedestal at the southwest entrance to the Calgary Airport terminal in April 1962. The aircraft was moved to the current museum site exactly thirty years later, in April 1992. The City of Calgary now owns the aircraft. FM136 was restored by the museum and dedicated to Ronnie Jenkins in the summer of 2011.

The Lancaster was a direct development of Avro’s unsuccessful Vulture-powered Manchester twin-engine bomber. The first four-engine Merlin-powered Lancaster flew on January 9, 1941.
The 4-engined Avro Lancaster heavy bomber makes its operational debut laying mines and the first bombing raid on Essen followed one week later. The Lancaster Mk.I, fitted with Merlin XX engines, remained the only version in service throughout 1942 and 1943.
While known to thousands of Canadian airmen who served with Bomber Command, the Lancaster will probably remain best known for its part in the famous Dam busters raid on the evening of May 16/17, 1943 and for its part in sinking the German battleship Tirpitz on November 12, 1944.

During the war Lancaster’s carried out a total of 156,000 missions and dropped 608,612 tons of bombs. This was double what the Halifax, the other major bomber used by the RAF, achieved. The Lancaster also carried the single largest and heaviest bomb used during the Second World War, the 10,000 kg. ‘Grand Slam’, a bomb so large that it hung below the airplane as it would not fit in the bomb bay.

Of the 7,400 Lancaster built, Victory Aircraft Ltd of Malton, Ontario manufactured 430 Lancaster Mk. Xs powered by Packard-built Merlin 28s and 224s. Following the war, the RCAF converted a number for service as maritime reconnaissance and search and rescue aircraft, the last of which was retired in 1965.

FAST FACTS
The Lancaster had a crew of only 7 men including only 1 pilot. The positions were Bomb Aimer who was also the Nose Gunner, Pilot, Flight Engineer, Navigator, Radio Operator, Mid Upper Gunner, Tail Gunner.

The Merlin engines of the Lancaster were British designed and Packard Car Company American and Canadian built.
The average flight lasted 6.5 to 7 hours but it could fly as long as 10-12 hours.

There are only 17 Lancaster’s remaining out of the 7,377 built (430 of which were built in Canada). Only two still fly. (The Mynarski Memorial out of Hamilton, Ontario, and the Battle of Britain Flight RAF in Coningsby, England).
Of the approximately 7400 built, 3,932 where lost in combat; either destroyed or too badly damaged to be able to fly again. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nm6z1a6LG3M&amp=&feature=player_embedded

FM136 – is now on display at the Hanger Museum of Calgary Alberta. Manufactured in 1945 by Victory Aircraft, this aircraft was assigned to No. 20 and 30 Maintenance Units in England in 1945 but was never issued to an active squadron. It returned to Canada in 1947 and was slowly being converted to Maritime Reconnaissance. All on paper taken on strength by No.404 "Buffalo" (MP) Squadron (Greenwood, Nova Scotia) as RX-136. Transferred to No.407 ‘Demon’ (MP) Squadron (Comox, BC). Struck off strength April 1961. Lancaster FM136 in 1962 was put on a pedestal at McCall Field, Calgary’s International AirPort as a Memorial to those who trained under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and Canada’s 10,000 who died in Bomber Command. https://youtu.be/sSXiny5mEpg

It was subsequently moved to Hanger Flight Museum of Calgary in 1992 and new shelter was built for it in 2007 where she is today 2017.

OUR AIRCRAFT - LADY ORCHID/JENKINS EXPRESS
Victory Aircraft Ltd manufactured Lancaster Mk X FM 136, Serial Number 31341 in 1945. Assigned to No. 20th and 30th Maintenance Units in England, as a replacement Bomber but she was never issued to an active squadron. Returned to Canada to the depot at Pearce, Alberta, it was eventually converted to Maritime Reconnaissance configuration and taken on strength by No. 404 ‘Buffalo’ (Maritime Patrol) Squadron in Greenwood, Nova Scotia.


FM136 On paper was subsequently transferred to No.407 'Demon' (MP) Squadron in Comox, British Columbia carrying operational markings RX-136 until it was struck off strength in April 1961. The aircraft was returned to Fort McLeod, Alberta to be sold as War Surplus.
FM136 was acquired by the Lancaster Club of Calgary and mounted on a pedestal at the southwest entrance to the Calgary Airport terminal in April 1962. The aircraft was moved to the current museum site exactly thirty years later in April 1992. The City of Calgary owns the aircraft. FM136 was restored by the Hanger Flight Museum and dedicated to Ronnie Jenkins in the summer of 2011. (This is a whole other story)

The Lancaster was a direct descendant of Avro’s unsuccessful Vulture engine powered Manchester Twin-Engine Bomber. The first four-engine Merlin-powered Lancaster flew on January 9, 1941. (my Birthday)

The 4-engined Avro Lancaster heavy bomber makes its operational debut laying mines and the first bombing raid on Essen followed one week later. The Lancaster B1 or Mark 1, fitted with Merlin XX engines, remained the only version in service throughout 1942 and 1943 followed by versions:

B.I Special
Aircraft were adapted to take first the super-heavy "Tallboy” and then "Grand Slam" bombs. Up-rated engines with paddle-bladed propellers gave more power, and the removal of gun turrets reduced weight and gave smoother lines. For the Tallboy, the bomb bay doors were bulged; for the Grand Slam, they were removed completely and the area faired over. For some Tallboy raids, the mid-upper turret was removed. This modification was retained for the Grand Slam aircraft, and in addition the nose turret was later removed. Two airframes (HK541 and SW244) were modified to carry a dorsal "saddle tank" with 1,200 gal (5,455 L) mounted aft of a modified canopy for increasing range. No. 1577 SD Flight tested the aircraft in India and Australia in 1945 for possible use in the Pacific but the tank adversely affected handling characteristics when full and an early type of inflight refueling designed in the late 1930s for commercial flying boats was later used instead.


PR.1
B 1 modified for photographic reconnaissance, operated by RAF No. 82 and No. 541 Squadrons, wartime. All armament and turrets were removed with a reconfigured nose and a camera carried in the bomb bay. The type was also operated by 683(PR) Squadron when it was re-formed in November 1950 to undertake photographic reconnaissance and mapping activities, initially based at RAF Fayid, Egypt, before moving to RAF Kabrit in February 1951, and subsequently Habbaniya in Iraq until the squadron was disbanded on 30 November 1953.


B.I (FE)
In anticipation of the needs of the Tiger Force operations against the Japanese in the far east (FE), a tropicalized variant was based on late production aircraft. The B I (FE) had modified radio, radar, nav-aids, and a 400-gal (1,818 L) tank installed in the bomb bay. Most were painted with white upper-surfaces to reduce internal temperatures in the tropical sun, and black undersides with a low demarcation between the colors, completely omitting any red colors on the national insignia in all cases to avoid confusion with the HINOMARU INSIGNIA of the Japanese.


B.II
Had Bristol Hercules radial engines (Hercules VI or XVI engines) powered variant, of which 300 were produced by Armstrong Whitworth. One difference between the two engine versions was that the VI had manual mixture control, requiring an extra lever on the throttle pedestal. Very early examples were fitted with an FN.64 ventral turret; however, these were quickly removed due to problems with aiming the turret through its periscope (which prevented the gunner from seeing a target he was not already aiming at), and inadequate traverse speed.

Due to the Luftwaffe Schräge Musik attacks, a variety of unofficial field modifications were made, including fitting of 20 mm cannon or a .50-inch caliber machine gun in the open hole where the FN. 64 had been installed, before an official modification (Mod 925) fitted with a .303-inch machine gun was authorized for the same location, though not in all aircraft. These were rarely installed on other variants as the JS2 Radar that was not used on the B II was mounted there. Three types of bulged bomb bay were used on the B II, the prototype having a narrow bulge running from just aft of the cockpit to the end of the bomb bay, while early production examples had a full width bulge that ran the same length and on late production examples the bomb bay doors were prominently bulged throughout their length.

B.III
This variant, which was built concurrently with the B I and was indistinguishable externally from that variant, was fitted with Packard-built Merlin engines. The Packard Marlins used Bendix/Stromberg pressure-injection carburetors requiring the addition of slow-running cut-off switches in the flight deck.


B III (Special)
"Upkeep" Bouncing Bomb used for dam busting bomb mounted under Lancaster B III (Special). The chain was driven by a hydraulic motor and gave the bomb its Backspin.

Known at the time of modification as the "Type 464 Provisioning"] Lancaster, 23 aircraft of this type were built to carry the "Upkeep" Bouncing Bomb for the dam busting raids. The bomb bay doors were removed and Vickers-built struts to carry the bomb were fitted in their place at Woodford Aerodrome near Stockport where the workers worked day and night. A hydraulic motor, driven by the pump previously used for the mid-upper turret was fitted to spin the bomb. Lamps were fitted in the bomb bay and nose for the simple height measurement system which enabled the accurate control of low-flying altitude at night. The mid-upper turret was removed to save weight and the gunner moved to the front turret to relieve the bomb aimer from having to man the front guns so that he could assist with map reading.

ASR.III/ASR.3
B III modified for air sea rescue, with three dipole ventral antennas fitted aft of the radar dome and carrying an air dropped lifeboat in an adapted bomb bay. The armament was often removed and the mid-upper turret faired-over, especially in postwar use. Observation windows were added to both sides of the rear fuselage, a port window just forward of the tail plane and a starboard window into the rear access door. Many ASR 3 conversions were fitted with Lincoln-style rudders.


GR.3/MR.3
B.III modified for maritime reconnaissance.


B.IV
The B.IV featured an increased wingspan and lengthened fuselage and new Boulton Paul F turret (two X 0.5in Browning Machine Guns) with framed "bay window" nose glazing. The prototypes (PW925, PW929 and PW932) were powered by two-stage Merlin 85s inboard and later, Merlin 68s on the outboard mounts. Because of the major redesign, the aircraft was quickly renamed Lincoln B1.


B.V
Increased wingspan and lengthened fuselage, two-stage Merlin 85s. Renamed Lincoln B2.


B.VI
Nine aircraft converted from B. IIIs. Fitted with Merlin 85/87 which had two-stage superchargers, giving much improved high-altitude performance. The B VI could achieve a maximum speed of 313 mph (505 km/h) at 18,200 ft (5,550 m) at 65,000 lb. (29,500 kg) takeoff weight and a service ceiling of 28,500 ft. (8,690 m) at the same weight. Climb to 28,000 ft. (8,500 m) at 65,000 lb (29,500 kg) takeoff weight was accomplished in 44.8 minutes with a maximum climb rate of 1,080 ft/min (5.5 m/s) at 1,000 ft. (305 m).

A Lancaster B VI was dived to a maximum indicated speed of 350 mph (565 km/h), or Mach 0.72 at 25,000 ft (7,620 m) in June 1944. The Merlin 85/87 series engines were fitted with annular cowlings similar to the Avro Lincoln and three bladed paddle-type propellers were fitted. These aircraft were only used by Path Finder units; by No.7, No. 83, No. 405, No. 635 Squadrons RCAF AND RAF. Often used as a "Master Bomber" the B VI's were allocated to RAF Bomber Command apart from two that were retained by Rolls Royce for installation and flight testing. Their dorsal and nose turrets were removed and fared-over. The more powerful engines proved troublesome in service and were disliked by ground maintenance staff for their rough running and propensity to 'surge and hunt', making synchronization impossible. This was caused by variations in the fuel/air mixture and over time would damage the engine. The B VI was withdrawn from operational service in November 1944 and surviving aircraft were used by Rolls Royce, the Royal Aircraft Establishment and the Bomb Ballistics Unit (BBU) for various testing and experimental duties.

B.VII
The B.VII was the final production version of the Lancaster. The Martin 250CE mid-upper turret was moved slightly further forward than on previous Marks and the Nash & Thomson FN-82 tail turret with twin 0.50 in (12.7 mm) Browning machine guns replaced the FN.20 turret with four Browning 303 Mark IIs. The Martin turret carried two 0.5-inch Browning Mark II machine guns which packed much more punch than the .303s of the older turret. However, these Martin turrets arrived too late for inclusion in the first 50 aircraft built by Austin and these were therefore referred to as Mark VII (Interim). Another 180 true Mark VIIs were built at Long bridge. Two sub-variants of the VII existed, the "Far East" (B VII FE) for use in tropical climates and the B VII "Western Union", which went to France.


B.X or Mark X
The B.X was a Canadian-built B.III with Canadian- and US-made instruments and electrics. On later batches the heavier Martin 250CE was substituted for the Nash & Thomson FN-50 mid-upper turret, mounted further forward to maintain center of gravity balance. Canada was a long-term operator of the Lancaster, using modified aircraft after the war for maritime patrol, search and rescue and photo-reconnaissance until 1964. During the Second World War, Canada's Victory Aircraft (what later became Avro Canada) was responsible for the development of the Lancastrian, which was duly designated the XPP for Mark 10 Passenger Plane. Six were built for Trans Canada Airlines or today's Air Canada.
Postwar the RCAF modified the B X (as the Lancaster Mk 10) to fill a variety of roles, with specific designations for each role. These included:


10AR: Area Reconnaissance - three aircraft modified for surveillance operations over the Arctic. Fitted with lengthened nose (40 inches (100 cm) longer) and carrying cameras and ELINT equipment. Remained in service until 1964.

10BR: Bomber Reconnaissance. Minimally modified variant with additional windows for observers in rear fuselage. 13 converted.

10DC: Drone controller with Ryan Fire Bee drones – two modified in 1957 and operational until 1961.

10MR (later 10MP): Maritime Reconnaissance or Maritime Patrol anti-submarine warfare (ASW) aircraft, based on BR with mid-upper turret removed. 70–75 converted. In service from 1950 to 1955.

10N: Navigational trainer. Five were converted.

10O: Orinda jet engine test bed for the engine used in the Avro CF-100 also to be found at Calgary’s Hanger Flight Museum.

10P: Photo reconnaissance mapping duties. 11 converted 1948–1950. Retired 1964.
10S&R: Interim search-and-rescue aircraft, minimally modified 10S. Replaced by disarmed 10BR and 10MRs.

10S: Standard - designation applied to baseline standard, with Merlin 224 engines, Marin mid-upper turret and H2S radar, for aircraft retained postwar for future use.
Sometimes referred to by unofficial designation 10U.


B.XV
Sole Canadian Lancaster B. XV/Lincoln B.XV
As per Lancaster B.IV/Lincoln B.1 but built in Canada and renamed Avro Lincoln XV. One example built before order cancelled when war ended.


While known to thousands of Canadian airmen who served with Bomber Command, the Lancaster will probably remain best known for its part in the famous Dam busters raid on the evening of May 16/17, 1943 and for its part in sinking the German battleship Tirpitz on November 12, 1944.

During the war Lancaster’s carried out a total of 156,000 missions and dropped 608,612 tons of bombs. This was double of what the Halifax, or any other major bomber used by the RAF had achieved. The Lancaster also carried the single largest and heaviest bomb used during the Second World War, the 10,000 kg. ‘Grand Slam’, a bomb so large that it hung below the airplane as it would not fit in the bomb bay.

Of the 430 Lancaster Mk. X’s manufactured at the Victory Aircraft Ltd of Malton, Ontario Canada All were powered by Packard-built Merlin 28s and 224s Engines. Following the war, the RCAF converted a number for service as maritime reconnaissance and search and rescue aircraft, the last of which was retired in 1966.

SOME MORE FAST FACTS
The Lancaster had a crew of only 7 men including only 1 pilot. The positions were Bomb Aimer who was also the Nose Gunner, Pilot, Flight Engineer, Navigator, Radio Operator, Mid Upper Gunner, Tail Gunner. The Merlin engines of the Lancaster were British designed Packard-built Merlin 28s and 224s Engines. The average flight lasted 6.5 to 7 hours but it could fly for 10 - 12 hours.


Most RAF long range bombers had some sort of chemical toilet facility (called an Elsan toilet), along with Pee-Pee tubes but they were highly unpopular, as they often overflowed and were difficult to use, crewmen often preferred to pee in a bottle or poo in a box and then throw it out of the aircraft.

The aircraft with the best toilet facility in WW2 was probably the Short Sunderland flying boat as this had a proper porcelain flushing toilet. A couple of decades later Mercury, Gemini and Apollo Astronauts had space suit diapers for the entire length of their flight.


There are only 17 Lancaster’s remaining out of the 7,377 built (430 of which were built in Canada). Only two still fly. (The Mynarski Memorial out of Hamilton, Ontario, and the Battle of Britain Flight RAF in Coningsby, England). Of the approximately 7,377 built 3,932 where lost in combat; either destroyed or too badly damaged to be able to fly again.
https://www.youtube.com/watch…

FM136 is now on display at the Hanger Flight Museum of Calgary Alberta Canada. Manufactured in 1945 by Victory Aircraft, this aircraft was assigned to No. 20 and 30 Maintenance Units in England in 1945 but was never issued to an active squadron. It returned to Canada in 1947 and was slowly being converted to Maritime Reconnaissance. All on paper taken on strength by No.404 "Buffalo" (MP) Squadron (Greenwood, Nova Scotia) as RX-136. Transferred to No.407 ‘Demon’ (MP) Squadron (Comox, BC). Struck off strength April 1961. Lancaster FM136 in 1962 was put on a pedestal at McCall Field, Calgary’s International Airport as a Memorial to those who trained under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan and Canada’s 10,000 who died in Bomber Command.
https://youtu.be/sSXiny5mEpg

FM136 was subsequently moved to Hanger Flight Museum of Calgary in 1992 and new shelter was built for it in 2007 where she is re-named with her nose art The Lady Orchid/Jenkins Express today 2017. Lancaster Photos by Richard but some are not:

https://photos.google.com/…/AF1QipO4J2jXBpDI_Puc9nkWzUIxKFm…
Victory Air Craft Milton Ontario Canada: As part of Canada’s 150th celebrations in 2017, the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum's Lancaster has been transformed into the temporary markings of the RUHR EXPRESS - Canada’s first built Lancaster, KB700. This aircraft was to be flown back to Canada after her 100th Mission but crashed on take off on her last mission.

Victory Aircraft Ltd. in Malton, Ontario Canada: https://youtu.be/OjpZxWLoToU

Victory Aircraft Lancaster Mark X Manufacture: https://photos.app.goo.gl/nWQNPPB3sfu7lmwB3

This initiative was made possible by the Community Fund for Canada’s 150th in collaboration between the Hamilton Community Foundation, the Government of Canada, and extraordinary leaders from coast to coast to coast. This short video has been produced by the same team that brought you;
"Reunion of Giants" https://youtu.be/5Ol2rem6d3g

Calgary's Lady Orchid Lancaster Mk X., FM136, Serial 31341, https://goo.gl/photos/qKJUtTAgECvZkdtq7

Photos by Richard Abbenbroek
Again, the Lady Orchid resides in The Hangar Flight Museum www.thehangarmuseum.ca

  This was posted by Richard Abbenbroek... http://bayo-hunter.blogspot.ca/